Online Bible, Ministry, & Philosophy Courses

Biblical Studies
  • BIB 110 Biblical Literature I - Old Testament (3 credits)
    Course Description

    A course that has as its primary content the Old Testament, with special attention given to the law, the prophets and the history of Israel.

    Learning Results

    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will:

    • Know the individual books of the Old Testament and their place in the overall flow of the whole.
    • Understand the major themes of the Old Testament and their place in Christian doctrine.
    • Recognize the primary characters of the Old Testament and their roles in the history of God’s people.
    • Incorporate the key principles of Old Testament truth in the experiences of daily living.

    Textbooks

    Most importantly, you will need a good cross-referenced Study Bible in a modern English translation, e.g., NASB, NIV, ESV.

    Learning Documentation

    This course consists of ten learning modules (each of which contain reading, quizzes, a written lesson, an online project, and an application assignment) and one final exam.

    Learning Evaluation

    Each module is worth 80 points, and the final exam is 200 points, for a total of 1,000 points possible.

    Faculty
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    Richard Studebaker

    PhD, Trinity International University, 1998
    MDiv, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, 1982
    BA, Bethel College, 1978

  • BIB 210 Biblical Literature II - New Testament (3 credits)
    Course Description

    A course that includes a foundation in New Testament study with a focus on Jesus Christ as portrayed in the Gospels and Epistles. Also included is a series of explorations into the relevancy of Christ to modern life.

    Learning Results

    The course is designed to meet the following objectives in whatever Christian tradition the student belongs—Catholic, Orthodox, or Protestant. If the student is not a Christian, then he/she will see why Christians believe as they do.

    • Give you an overview of the entire New Testament, thus laying a good foundation for further and more detailed study of the New Testament.
    • Increase your knowledge of the important figures, issues and doctrines appearing in the New Testament.
    • Be able to articulate the purpose and message of each book of the New Testament.
    • Be aware of the “big picture” of the New Testament and to be able to relate the parts to the whole
      • Appreciate the significance of the major theological themes in the New Testament.
    • Develop an ability to take the factual material of the New Testament and to make it applicable to Christian spirituality today.

    Textbooks

    Optional texts:

    • C. K. Barrett, The New Testament Background, rev. ed. (San Francisco: Harper, 1995)
    • H. Wayne House, Chronological and Background Charts of the New Testament, 2nd ed. (Grand Rapids: Zondervan, 2009)

    *Once a student is enrolled, the professor will provide options for accessing these resources at no or low cost.

    Learning Documentation

    This course consists of 10 modules with a combination of discussion topics, checkpoints, internet research projects, quizzes, and papers in each.

    Learning Evaluation

    Assignments are worth between 50 and 100 points each, for a total of 1,000 points possible.

    Faculty
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    Dr. Daniel Chadwick

    PhD, Trinity Theological Seminary, 1999
    MA, Fordham University, 1995
    MA, Jewish Theological Seminary, 1992
    MAH, University of Buffalo, 1990
    BA, University of Buffalo, 1981

  • BIB 213 Survey of Biblical Literature (4 credits)
    Course Description

    A survey of the Bible, both Old and New Testaments, with special attention given to the major persons and themes of the individual books.

    Learning Results

    Upon successful completion of this course, the objectives of this course are that each student will:

    • Know the individual books of the Old and New Testaments and their place in the overall flow of the whole Bible.
    • Understand the major themes of the Old and New Testaments and their place in Christian doctrine.
    • Recognize the primary characters of the Old and New Testaments and their roles in the history of God’s people.
    • Know a strategy for effective personal Bible study in order to incorporate the key principles of Old and New Testament truth in the experiences of daily living.

    Textbooks

    Required:

    • A good cross-referenced Study Bible in a modern English translation, e.g., NASB, NIV, ESV.

    Recommended texts:

    • Beitzel, Barry. The Moody Atlas of Bible Lands, Moody Press: 1985
    • Halley, H. H. Bible Handbook, Zondervan: 1993

    Learning Documentation

    This course consists of 13 written lessons, 11 application questions, 2 Bible study projects (one from the Old Testament and one from the New), and one final exam.

    Learning Evaluation

    Each written lesson is worth between 40 and 50 points, the application questions are worth 10 points each, the Bible Study projects are each worth 30 points, and the final exam is worth 200 points, for a total of 1,000 points in the course.

    Faculty
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    Dr. Richard Studebaker

    PhD, Trinity International University, 1998
    MDiv, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, 1982
    BA, Bethel College, 1978

  • BIB 217 Genesis (3 credits)
    Course Description

    A detailed study of the book of "beginnings," giving attention to its authorship, authenticity, chronology, and spiritual implication.

    Learning Results

    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Understand the major theological concepts in biblical cosmology.
    • Explicate key issues involved in the fall of man and the subsequent consequences.
    • Distinguish between various theories regarding the flood and the consequences of it, noting especially the water vapor canopy hypothesis.
    • Trace the various failures of mankind leading to the call of Abraham and the Abrahamic covenant.
    • Trace the life of Abraham as a flawed recipient of God's grace.
    • Develop the significance of the Abrahamic covenant
    • Follow Isaac as an intermediary figure between Abraham and Jacob.
    • Follow the life of Jacob in his transition from a young man known as "the supplanter" to the head of a clan.
    • Evaluate the role of Joseph in extricating the young nation from Canaan to allow it to mature in Egypt.

    Textbooks

    A good study Bible is mandatory, preferably in a modern translation. The New American Standard Version (NASV) or the New International Version (NIV) are particularly recommended.

    Learning Documentation

    This course consists of 15 assignments based on corresponding chapter reading and one exam.

    Learning Evaluation

    Each assignment is worth 100 points as is the exam, for a total of 1,600 points possible.

    Faculty
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    Dr. David Moore

    PhD, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, 1999
    DMin, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2002
    MDiv, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, 1985
    BA, Hardin-Simmons University, 1982

  • BIB 218 Matthew (3 credits)
    Course Description

    A detailed study of the purpose, structure, and theology of Matthew's Gospel, with special emphasis on the titles and teachings of Jesus, significant events in His life, and the application of the Gospel to the present time.

    Learning Results

    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will:

    • Express a basic and clear understanding of Matthew's Gospel.
    • Recognize and articulate the historical background of Matthew's Gospel.
    • Identify major theological themes taught in Matthew's Gospel.
    • Describe the uniqueness of the person of Jesus Christ, seen in both his divinity and humanity.
    • Explain the distinctive nature of the Kingdom of God, seen as inaugurated but waiting for its final fulfillment, and how this reality relates to Christian living.
    • Articulate the basic principles for and application of Christian discipleship.
    • Convey an analytical, objective, and biblical understanding of the truths contained in the Gospel, particularly in relation to the significance of the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus.
    • Apply objective truths taken from this study to concrete areas of everyday life, so that in all things God might be glorified.

    Textbooks
    Learning Documentation

    This course consists of reading assignments, discussion questions, a creative project, a research paper, and 2 exams.

    Learning Evaluation

    The assignments range in worth from 5 to 100 points and the exams are 100 points each, for a total of 500 points possible. 

    Faculty
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    Dr. Jason Myers

    PhD, Asbury Theological Seminary, 2015
    MDiv, Grand Rapids Theological Seminary, 2010
    BA, Cedarville University, 2007

  • BIB 272 Inductive Study of the Bible (3 credits)
    Course Description

    Specific methods are taught to enable the students to understand the propositions of the biblical text, relate those propositions to one another, and ask questions of the text in order to discover what the biblical writers meant to convey through their writings.

    Learning Results

    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify the various genres of Scripture and explain how they affect interpretation.
    • Identify the common figures of speech and methods of utilizing figurative language and interpret them appropriately.
    • Identify and isolate literary units appropriate for interpretational/applicational use.
    • Demonstrate the ability to analyze any biblical text, derive universal principles from it, and then develop proper modern day applications for a variety of audiences.
    • Understand how literary units are parts of biblical books and are thus subject to the "interpretative spiral".
    • Know where to find basic tools, which assist in determining the meaning of a text, and have a working knowledge of how to utilize them.
    • Distinguish between the meaning of a text and applications derived from a text.
    • Understand various means by which computers can be used in biblical studies and Christian ministries.

    Textbooks

    *Once a student is enrolled, the professor will provide options for accessing these resources at no or low cost.

    Learning Documentation

    This course consists of 15 assignments and no exams.

    Learning Evaluation

    Each assignment is worth between 25 and 200 points, for a total of 1,000 points possible.

    Faculty
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    Dr. Daniel Chadwick

    PhD, Trinity Theological Seminary, 1999
    MA, Fordham University, 1995
    MA, Jewish Theological Seminary, 1992
    MAH, University of Buffalo, 1990
    BA, University of Buffalo, 1981

  • BIB 311 The Gospel of John (3 credits)
    Course Description

    An analytical study of the content of the fourth gospel, with special emphasis on the distinctive elements of John's message.

    Learning Results

    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will:

    • Learn the meaning and purpose of John's gospel through careful study of the text of John itself and through interaction with the premiere secondary commentaries, books, and scholarly articles which attempt to interpret John.
    • Gain an understanding of the relationship of the Gospel of John to the Synoptic Gospels and to the rest of the New Testament.
    • Comprehend the challenge of John's Gospel for the people of our world today.
    • Gain a deeper understanding of the Christian faith through the Gospel of John.

    Textbooks

    Also required: A literal (formal equivalent) translation of the Gospel of John (or something close to literal) such as The New American Standard Bible (NASB); The New Revised Standard Version (NRSV); The New International Version (NIV), or English Standard Version (ESV).

    Learning Documentation

    This course consists of 12 assignments based on the chapters of the book of John and one final project.

    Learning Evaluation

    Each assignment is worth 100 points and the final project is 200 points, for a total of 1,400 points possible.

    Faculty
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    Dr. Jason Myers

    PhD, Asbury Theological Seminary, 2015
    MDiv, Grand Rapids Theological Seminary, 2010
    BA, Cedarville University, 2007

  • BIB 313 Romans (3 credits)
    Course Description

    A detailed study of the book of Romans with special emphasis on Paul's purpose in writing the book and the development of his argument throughout the book.

    Learning Results

    The goals of this course are six-fold—that the students:

    • Learn the meaning and purpose of Paul’s letter to the Romans through careful reading of the primary text of Romans itself.
    • Engage in inductive analysis of Romans.
    • Thoughtfully dialogue with Peter Stuhlmacher’s Romans commentary.
    • Critically interact with the other major commentaries and secondary sources on Romans.
    • Critically analyze N.T. Wright’s synthesis of Paul’s theology in Romans.
    • Articulate their personal judgments concerning the major exegetical issues of Romans itself.

    Textbooks

    Required to have three English translations of Paul's letter to the Romans.

    Learning Documentation

    This course consists of 15 assignments including papers and study questions, and no exams.

    Learning Evaluation

    Lesson 1 assignment is worth 50 points, lessons 2-14 are worth 20 points each, and Lesson 15 assignment is worth 40 points, for a total of 350 points possible.

    Faculty
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    Dr. Ed Meadors

    PhD, The University of Aberdeen, 1993
    MA, Wheaton College Graduate School, 1989
    BA, Wheaton College, 1986

  • BIB 320 The Pentateuch (3 credits)
    Course Description

    Emphasizes the historical narrative and the content of the law of God. Special attention is given to the Genesis account of the origin of the cosmos, man, sin, and salvation. The authorship of the Pentateuch is considered.

    Learning Results

    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will:

    • Understand key arguments that have been made both for and against Mosaic authorship of the Pentateuch.
    • Set forth key data supporting Mosaic authorship of the Pentateuch.
    • Distinguish the major theological concepts in Biblical cosmology.
    • Explicate key issues involved in the fall of man and the subsequent consequences.
    • Trace subsequent failures of mankind leading to the call of Abraham and the Abrahamic covenant.
    • Develop the significance of the Abrahamic covenant.
    • Explain the Exodus and Passover as they relate to salvation history.
    • Distinguish between casuistic and apodictic law, and assess the role of apodictic law in ancient Israel and its application to modern societal conditions.
    • Compare and contrast the concepts of sacrifice in the Old Testament with the New Testament teachings concerning the death of Christ.
    • Trace the development and history of the fledgling nation of Israel from Mt. Sinai to the Transjordan.
    • Evaluate key explanations of the relationship between the Old Testament law and the New Testament.
    • Show the ability to do research and lesson preparation by completing a major project on some aspect of the Pentateuch.

    Textbooks

    A good study Bible is required, preferably in a modern translation. The New American Standard Version (NAU) or the New International Version (NIV) are particularly recommended.

    Learning Documentation

    This course consists of 13 exams and one final comprehensive exam, as well as a major project.

    Learning Evaluation

    Each exam is worth 40 points, the final exam is worth 100 points, and the major project is worth 100 points, for a total of 720 points possible.

    Faculty
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    Dr. David Moore

    PhD, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, 1999
    DMin, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2002
    MDiv, Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, 1985
    BA, Hardin-Simmons University, 1982

  • BIB 330 Acts & the Early Church (3 credits)
    Course Description

    A historical study with particular attention given to the missionary expansion of the early church, the work of the Holy Spirit and the place of the church in the world.

    Learning Results

    Upon successful completion of this course, the student should:

    • Learn the major theological themes that Luke intended to impress upon his audience through the historical narratives that constitute his two-volume composition.
    • Gain in depth understanding of the historical importance of the events that led to the spread of the gospel from Judea through Samaria, Syria, Cyprus, Galatia, Asia, Achaia, and eventually to Rome.
    • Deepen in their understanding of the dynamics of Christian discipleship, as they apply the teachings of Acts to their own personal lives.
    • Gain a broader understanding of the corporate mission of the church against the background of its origin in Acts 2.

    Textbooks

    A literal (formal equivalent) translation of the Bible is required.

    Learning Documentation

    This course consists of ten assignments, the majority of which are papers, and one final comprehensive essay exam.

    Learning Evaluation

    The assignments range in points from 20 to 40, for a total of 260 points.

    Faculty
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    Ed Meadors

    PhD, The University of Aberdeen, 1993
    MA, Wheaton College Graduate School, 1989
    BA, Wheaton College, 1986

  • BIB 331 Pauline Epistles (3 credits)
    Course Description

    Attention is given to the life, ministry, and writings of Paul. The doctrinal, pastoral, and personal epistles of Paul are studied with reference to their geographical and historical settings, the organization of the Apostolic Church and the development of Christian doctrine. Careful exegesis is made of selected portions of each epistle.

    Learning Results

    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will:

    • Utilize the tools of biblical and theological research in order to uncover more insight into the thought and ministry of the Apostle Paul.
    • Be aware of and skillful in relating the life setting of Paul’s epistles to their argument (the subject of a literary work) and recognizing the circumstantial nature of Pauline correspondence.
    • Know the leading themes, ideas, and doctrines of Paul’s Gospel.

    Textbooks

    *Once a student is enrolled, the professor will provide options for accessing these resources at no or low cost.

    Learning Documentation

    This course consists of 12 assignments and no exams.

    Learning Evaluation

    Each assignment is worth 100 points with the exception of the final assignment which is 150 points for a total of 1,250 points possible.

    Faculty
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    Dr. Daniel Chadwick

    PhD, Trinity Theological Seminary, 1999
    MA, Fordham University, 1995
    MA, Jewish Theological Seminary, 1992
    MAH, University of Buffalo, 1990
    BA, University of Buffalo, 1981

  • BIB 332 Hebrews & General Epistles (3 credits)
    Course Description

    A study of the non-Pauline epistles with attention to their introductory issues (authorship, audience, date, setting, etc.) and theological issues. The authors’ arguments will be analyzed and various interpretations of debated passages will be examined. Critical thinking skills will be employed in studying the letters.

    Learning Results

    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Trace the author’s argument in each letter.
    • Articulate key theological issues dealt by each letter.
    • Understand how the introductory issues such as the authorship, date, occasion and purpose of each letter enhance interpretation of the letter.

    To experience spiritual maturity with the following outcomes:

    • You will articulate the biblical foundations of your faith and explain how they impact daily life.
    • You will practice biblical principles of a growing Christian faith as evidenced by spiritual disciplines.

    Textbooks
    Learning Documentation

    This course consists of 10 assignments, 1 journaling, and a midterm and final exam.

    Learning Evaluation

    Each assignment is worth 100 points, the journal worth 500 points, and the midterm and final are each worth 250 points, for a total of 2000 points for the course.

    Faculty
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    Dr. Joseph Pak

    PhD, Dallas Theological Seminary, 2001
    STM, Dallas Theological Seminary, 1993
    MDiv, Liberty Baptist Theological Seminary, 1988
    BS, Virginia Tech, 1985

  • BIB 341 The Gospels (3 credits)
    Course Description

    This course explores the nature of the Gospel as told in the accounts of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John with an emphasis on understanding the various themes of the gospel writers as they tell the story of the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus and his significance in revealing God’s message of salvation. Attention is given to the literary and theological characteristics of each account while also setting them within the context of both the message of the Old Testament and within first century Judaism. In doing so, students will learn the basic of gospel criticism. Finally, this course seeks to relate the message and mission of Jesus to today’s world and our lives as followers of Jesus within the fellowship of the body of Christ, the church.

    Learning Results

    Students will be able to perform the following based on the accounts of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John (referred to as MMLJ):

    • Articulate the primary audiences of each gospel account (MMLJ) and cite at least 10 biblical passages from each account of MMLJ as references to back up their conclusions.
    • Present the theme and theology of each account (MMLJ) in a well-articulated summary as well as provide at least 10 instances for each account that demonstrates and supports that theme. Students will be able to articulate their reason for using each biblical instance showing how each citation supports the writer’s theme and point of view.
    • Describe the times (Intertestamental) leading up to the days of Jesus’ ministry and how it provided the cultural backdrop for the accounts of MMLJ as they told their stories of Jesus.
    • Defend why the accounts of MMLJ are to be accepted as trustworthy historical biographies of Jesus in light of modern scholarship.
    • Select any given passage from MMLJ and demonstrate how it fits into the author’s overarching theme.
    • Describe the mission and ministry of Jesus including his death and resurrection in terms of the distinctive voices of MMLJ.
    • Relate how the gospel message of MMLJ continues to address the world, the Church, and Christians, demonstrating that the first century message still addresses the current situations of today.
    • Articulate at least four demands the Gospel places upon the church and individual Christians as they proclaim the ministry and message of Jesus in today’s world.
    • Present a working definition of the Gospel and drawing upon it, address issues of discipleship in following Jesus in the contemporary culture.

    Textbooks
    Learning Documentation

    Within the Sections are a series of eight assignments. The assignments include the following:

    • Videos
    • Readings
    • Writing of summaries
    • Quizzes
    • Application manual
    • Comprehensive exam

    Learning Evaluation

    Grading Percentages:

    Videos: 26%
    Readings/Summaries: 42%
    Quizzes: 12.5%
    Application manual: 7%
    Comprehensive exam: 12.5%

    Faculty
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    Dr. David Sparks

    DMin, Drew University, 1986
    MDiv, Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, 1979
    BA, Wheaton College, 1975

  • BIB 350 Poetic & Wisdom Literature (3 credits)
    Course Description

    Hebrew poetry and wisdom as presented in the books of Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Lamentations, and the Song of Solomon.

    Learning Results

    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Understand the genre of Old Testament wisdom literature and how it compares to non-Israelite writings.
    • Know the individual books of the Old Testament wisdom literature and their broad themes.
    • Recognize the primary characters of the Old Testament wisdom literature and their life narratives.
    • Incorporate the key principles of Old Testament wisdom literature in the experiences of daily living.

    Textbooks

    Plan to have a good cross-referenced Study Bible in a modern English translation, e.g., NASB, NIV, ESV.

    Learning Documentation

    This course consists of 10 modules, each of which contains a Bible reading assignment and online quiz, a textbook reading assignment and online quiz, a written lesson with questions, an online project, and an application assignment. There is one final exam at the end of the course.

    Learning Evaluation

    Each module is worth 80 points, and the final exam is worth 200 points, for a total of 1000 points in the class.

    Faculty
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    Dr. Richard Studebaker

    PhD, Trinity International University, 1998
    MDiv, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, 1982
    BA, Bethel College, 1978

Religion
  • IAS 110 Foundations of the Christian Liberal Arts (4 credits)
    Course Description

    An introduction to the liberal arts and the integration of faith and learning. The primary thrust is to use the central concept of human flourishing to begin thinking about a life worth living and the role of the liberal arts in connecting our faith to everything we think and do.

    Learning Results

    Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to:

    • Understand, value, and desire to fully engage their Christian liberal arts education as an act of worship.
    • Connect their educational experiences to the reconciliation of relationships with God, the world, others, and themselves.
    • Pursue their education with a view to God’s unique calling on their lives.

    Textbooks
    Learning Documentation

    This course consists of opening and concluding profile papers, four reflective essays, three film reflective essays, and a final essay exam.

    Learning Evaluation

    The opening and concluding profile are each worth 10% of the grade, the reflective essays are worth 40%, the film series essays are worth 15%, and the final exam is worth 25% of the final grade.

    Faculty
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    Dr. Jeff Cramer

    PhD, Purdue University, 2007
    MS, Indiana University, 1998
    BS, Taylor University, 1990

  • REL 313 Historic Christian Belief (3 credits)
    Course Description

    A survey of Christian belief as developed during the history of the church.

    Learning Results

    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will have learned about:

    • The various events and thinkers that shaped Christian ideas.
    • The reasons as to how the main doctrines (e.g., the Trinity) evolved.
    • An understanding concerning the main teachings.
    • The major theologians of the Church.
    • The big picture of Christian thought for the past 2000 years through Catholic, Orthodox, and Protestant thinkers.

    Textbooks

    *Once a student is enrolled, the professor will provide options for accessing these resources at no or low cost.

    Learning Documentation

    This course consists of 10 Modules which contain a variety of assignments, such as Discussion Topics, Quizzes, Checkpoints, Papers, Internet Research, and a Final Project.

    Learning Evaluation

    Assignments are worth 50-100 points each, with the final project worth 200, for a total of 1,000 points in the course.

    Faculty
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    Dr. Daniel Chadwick

    PhD, Trinity Theological Seminary, 1999
    MA, Fordham University, 1995
    MA, Jewish Theological Seminary, 1992
    MAH, University of Buffalo, 1990
    BA, University of Buffalo, 1981

  • THE 243 Introduction to Theology (3 credits)
    Course Description

    This course is a survey of the classical categories of Christian thought concerning Theology Proper (i.e., divinity), Christology, Pneumatology, Soteriology, Anthropology (insofar as it determines Soteriology), Ecclesiology, and Eschatology.

    Learning Results

    This course will:

    • Provide a review of the following branches of Christian Systematic Theology—Theology Proper (Trinity), Christology, Anthropology, Pneumatology, Soteriology, Ecclesiology, and Eschatology.
    • Distinguish Systematic Theology from Biblical, Historical, and Pastoral/Practical Theology.
    • Present the various Christian approaches to the topics.
    • Offer the consensus and divisions of approach.
    • Stimulate possible applications of doctrines.

    Textbooks

    *Once a student is enrolled, the professor will provide options for accessing this resource at no or low cost.

    Learning Documentation

    This course includes discussion topics, checkpoints, internet research, quizzes, papers, and a final project.

    Learning Evaluation

    The individual assignments are worth between 25 and 50 points, with the quizzes and the papers worth 50 points each, and the final project worth 200 points, for a total of 1000 points for the course.

    Faculty
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    Dr. Daniel Chadwick

    PhD, Trinity Theological Seminary, 1999
    MA, Fordham University, 1995
    MA, Jewish Theological Seminary, 1992
    MAH, University of Buffalo, 1990
    BA, University of Buffalo, 1981

Philosophy
  • PHI 110 Introduction to Philosophy (3 credits)
    Course Description

    The purpose of this course is to equip students to think critically and Christianly about key issues in the Western philosophical tradition.

    Learning Results

    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will:

    • Gain understanding of the central issues in the Western philosophical tradition.
    • Develop proficiency in reading, analyzing, and communicating philosophical texts.
    • Improve writing skills by presenting ideas and arguments with clarity and precision.
    • Gain understanding of the importance of the development of the mind for Christian spiritual formation.
    • Integrate the discipline of philosophical inquiry into the ongoing development of a Christian worldview.

    Textbooks
    Learning Documentation

    This course consists of 8 reading/video assignments, 8 reaction papers, 2 reflection papers, 3 essay exams, and a thesis paper.

    Learning Evaluation

    The reading/video assignments are worth 5 points each, each reaction paper is worth 20 points, the reflection papers are worth 20 points each, each exam is worth 120 points, and the thesis paper is worth 200 points, for a total of 800 points possible.

    Faculty
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    Dr. Brent Kelly

    PhD, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2004
    MDiv, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 1999
    BS, Multnomah Bible College, 1985

  • PHI 201 Logic (3 credits)
    Course Description

    A study of classical and contemporary formulations of the principles of human thought. Proper deductive and inductive logic is contrasted with fallacies. Categorical logic, truth functional logic, and quantificational logic are examined.

    Learning Results

    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will:

    • Become competent in expressing language in the formalized expressions of categorical, truth functional, and quantificational logic.
    • Understand how to evaluate simple arguments in categorical, truth functional, and quantificational logic.
    • Recognize and evaluate various forms of inductive logic including generalization, analogy, and Mill's methods.
    • Clarify his/her thinking by recognizing and avoiding fallacies.

    Textbooks
    Learning Documentation

    This course consists of 14 assignments and 14 exams.

    Learning Evaluation

    Each assignment is worth 20 points and the exams are 50 points each, for a total of 980 points possible.

    Faculty
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    Dr. Brent Kelly

    PhD, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2004
    MDiv, Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 1999
    BS, Multnomah Bible College, 1985

  • PHI 322 World Religions: Western Tradition (3 credits)
    Course Description

    A study of Judaism, Islam, Zoroastrianism, and related religious movements.

    Learning Results

    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will learn:

    • The basic history, theology, and ritual traditions of the non-Christian Western Religions.
    • The basic types of methodology used in religious studies and apply these to interactions with non-Christian Western Religions.
    • About Christian responses to the faith claims of other Western Religions.

    Textbooks
    Learning Documentation

    This course consists of six quizzes, two interviews, three site observations, a book reflection, and a research paper.

    Learning Evaluation

    The quizzes and the research paper are each worth 30% of the grade, the site observations and the book reflection are each worth 10% of the grade, and the interviews are worth 20% of the final grade. Each assignment is worth 100 points each, for a total of 1,300 points possible.

    Faculty
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    Dr. Robert Danielson

    PhD, Asbury Theological Seminary, 2005
    MSLS, University of Kentucky, 2011
    MA, McGill University, 1994
    BA, Florida State University, 1991

  • PHI 323 World Religions: Eastern Tradition (3 credits)
    Course Description

    A study of Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, Shinto, and Chinese religions.

    Learning Results

    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will have learned:

    • The basic history, theology, and ritual traditions of the non-Christian Eastern Religions.
    • The basic types of methodology used in religious studies and apply these to interactions with non-Christian Eastern Religions.
    • About Christian responses to the faith claims of Eastern Religions.

    Textbooks
    Learning Documentation

    This course consists of six quizzes, two interviews, three site observations, a book reflection, and a research paper.

    Learning Evaluation

    The quizzes are worth 20 points each, and the interviews, site observations, book reflection, and research paper are worth 100 points each, for a total of 820 points possible.

    Faculty
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    Dr. Robbie Danielson

    PhD, Asbury Theological Seminary, 2005
    MSLS, University of Kentucky, 2011
    MA, McGill University, 1994
    BA, Florida State University, 1991

  • PHI 413 Contemporary Christian Belief (3 credits)
    Course Description

    The integration of Christian thought with contemporary ideas and an introduction to Christian apologetics. Engaging those questions that pose the greatest challenge to Christian faith in contemporary culture, in the hope of receiving from God a clearer perception of the truth, goodness and beauty of the Gospel.

    Learning Results

    The objective of all Christian pursuits of truth, goodness and beauty is to enjoy the goodness of God, who has not left us in darkness, but has made himself known in Jesus Christ by the Holy Spirit, conveyed through the Scriptures as witnessed by His people.

    The formal objectives of the course are as follows:

    • to cultivate an appreciation for the intellectual strength and beauty of the Christian faith;
    • to develop the foundations for thoughtful and winsome answers to key questions often posed as objections to faith in Christ;
    • to enhance skills in critical reasoning and conceptual analysis;
    • to grow (1) in our understanding of the purpose and importance of being able to “give a reason for the hope you have” and (2) in our ability to do this in conversation with others “with gentleness and respect” (I Peter 3:15);
    • to better understand what it means to live a compelling Christian life;
    • to encourage a more courageous, loving, open, peaceful and fruitful engagement with contemporary culture; and,
    • to participate in the work of the Spirit to strengthen our faith, hope and love; and, thereby amplify our involvement in His service for the building up of Christ-centered community and the abounding of the Gospel of His grace to all people.

    Textbooks
    Learning Documentation

    This course consists of an opening survey, reading assignment, a book summary, interviews and analysis, a written response paper, and three exams.

    Learning Evaluation

    The opening survey is worth 10 points, the reading assignments are worth 420 points, the book summary 100 points, the interviews/analysis 70 points, written response 50 points, the first two exams 100 points each, and the final exam  150 points – for a total of 1000 points in the course.

    Faculty
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    Dr. Kevin Diller

    PhD, University of St. Andrews, 2008
    ThM, Calvin Theological Seminary, 2001
    MDiv, Princeton Theological Seminary, 1997
    BA, Taylor University, 1993